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Historic Preservation Commission

Historic Preservation Commission
The Historic Preservation Commission consists of seven members appointed by the Mayor with the consent of the Board of Aldermen. Two members (1 each) shall be from the Board of Aldermen and the Planning Commission. Of the remaining five (5) members, 1 or more shall be a resident and/or business owner in each locally designated historic district or conservation district or an owner /resident of a locally designated landmark. All Commission members must have a demonstrated interest, competence or knowledge in historic preservation. All commission member terms of office are three years in length. Below are the current Historic Preservation Commission members.

2014 Historic Preservation Commission Meeting Schedule

Historic Preservation Commission Members

Grandview Historic/Conservation Districts Map

2013 Historic Preservation Commission Minutes

The State of Missouri has taken the time to put the City’s Architectural Survey information in digital format, which forms the basis for our local historic preservation efforts. These files include the Map, the Report and the Survey. Click here to review all the files.  

 

Powers and Duties
The Historic Preservation Commission has a number of powers and duties, all of which are
outlined in the City’s Zoning Ordinance, Section 31-25A(C)(7). You may review these powers and duties by clicking here .

Residential Historic District

The City of Grandview has recently been awarded with a preliminary grant in the amount of $7,430.00 from the Missouri Historic Preservation Office for the development of a walking tour, which will include a brochure, a podcast and interactive web tour, for the Grandview Road – Highgrove Road Neighborhood Historic District located in the heart of Grandview, Missouri. Click here to see the preliminary brochure.

The City of Grandview has a Residential Historic District which is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This Residential Historic District is known as the Grandview Road –Highgrove Road Neighborhood Historic District and was approved by the Board of Aldermen on October 23, 2007. The approximate boundaries of this residential historic district include the properties on the south side of Highgrove Road between 12th Street and Grandview Road, properties on the west side of 10th Street (from just north of Rhodes Avenue to Highgrove Road) and properties on the west side of Grandview Road at Highgrove. Click on the map to view the Historic District boundaries. If you would like to view the actual ordinance approving the Residential Historic District, click here.

Queen_Anne_CottageThis area of Grandview is historically significant because it represents the first subdivisions of land after the original platting of the Town of Grandview around 1900. This area is architecturally significant because many of the homes constructed were done so by the Powell Brothers and were “pattern book” homes, home plans selected from books by the owners. These homes were built in the 1910-1920’s and have unique architectural styles such as Late Victorian Queen Anne, Late 19th and Early 20th Century Revival Colonial, Tudor, Mission and Late 19th Century and Early 20th Century American Movement Cratfsman/Bungalow. Some photos of the residential structures in the District and their architectural styles are avaialable below.

Mission Revival  Ntnl_Folkhouse_Bungalow Colonial Revival Snow_White_Cottage Tudor_Revival

In an effort to preserve the historical significance and architectural character of the homes in this District, the City worked with the homeowners and a consultant, Sally Schwenk and Associates, to develop a set of Design Guidelines.

These Design Guidelines are to be used as guide for homeowners wishing to make improvements to the exterior of the residence. The Guidelines lay out the process whereby the homeowner can make these improvements such that the historical and architectural significance is maintained.

Main Street Conservation District

Example 2The City of Grandview recently approved the establishment of a Conservation District along Main Street because certain properties have been found to possess special historical, architectural or cultural significance as part of the heritage of the City, but of lesser significance than a historic district. This Main Street Conservation District was approved by the Board of Aldermen on November 25, 2008. The approximate boundaries of this conservation district include the properties along both sides of Main Street (from 10th Street to 5th Street) between Goode Avenue and Rhodes Avenue. Click to see the map of the Conservation District boundaries. If you would like to view the actual ordinance establishing the Main Street Conservation District, click here.
Example 3This area of Grandview possesses special historical, architectural or cultural significance as part of the heritage of the City because it encompasses portions of the original town site plat filed by James G. Feland and James W. Jones in December 1889, specifically that portion form Fifth Street to Grandview Road. The Davidson Addition, as recorded by Luther and Ardenia Davidson in April 1912, covers one east/west block from Grandview Road to 10th Street. The Lincoln Lane Subdivision, as recorded by Lincoln & Adah Goddard and Robert & Olga Lyons in June 1946, comprises that portion of the District on the north side of Main Street and extends 156 feet east of 10th Street.

 

 

Example 4

Each of these 3 areas represents a different historical period in Grandview’s evolution. The original town site represents the establishment of Grandview as a railroad-centered community and its additional function as a postal stop along the railway line. The Davidson Addition was built during a period of Grandview’s history when people realized Grandview as a good economic opportunity, marked by many business ventures opening and rapid town growth. The Lincoln Lane Subdivision was built during a period when the Great depression was ending, World War II was ending and Harry S. Truman walked the streets of Grandview as the nation’s president. Commercial and retail activity within the District is very heavily centered along Main Street and the building architecture is representative of this time period, including some alterations of the front façade.

To maintain the historical and architectural elements of the structures within this Conservation District, the City worked with the property owners within the District and a consultant, Sally Schwenk and Associates, to develop a set of Design Guidelines. These Design Guidelines are to be used as a guide for property owners wishing to make improvements to the exterior of the structures. The Guidelines lay out the process whereby the property owners can make these improvements such that the historical and architectural significance is maintained. Below are some more examples of the historically and architecturally significant structures within the Main Street Conservation District.

Example 5Example 1Example 6Example 7

 

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Last updated: 12/26/2013 10:22:29 AM